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I am human, an update

June 14, 2014

I haven’t written in a while, but I thought it was time for an update. This blog is taking/has taken more of a personal direction while most of my professional stuff, on the subject of “right care,” is posted on the Less is More blog.

For what it’s worth, I still read a ridiculous number of medical articles, some of which get a reflection or précis treatment on that blog, and the rest of which might appear on my DrOttematic or Less is More Med twitter feeds.

Life:

Our kittens are now a year old, they really like going outside and have learned how to jump out of second story windows; perhaps I’ll learn some veterinary medicine😦. Ian’s flying a different plane now. The work is more rewarding for him and he has a better schedule which makes it easier for us to travel and plan fun things. The weather in Vancouver has been wonderful and I now have a used folding/electric bike to toodle around on as well as a stationary bike for rainy days. This week I had enough time off to get together some Emergency Preparedness supplies; it has been on my “to do” list for a long time, but the tips I got at a Wilderness Medicine course, Ian’s recent reading about the Cascadia Fault, and having a few days off at home prompted me to get organized. There are still a few gaps; I’m certainly not a “panicked prepper,” but it feels good to know that if the power goes out or we don’t have running water for a few days, we’ll be self-sufficient.

Travel:

This year has been a bit subdued (aka less exotic) compared to previous ones, but we did enjoy a week chasing lava on Big Island, Hawaii in January, a nice quick trip to Quebec City during Carnaval de Québec in February, a week in Toronto in March (while Ian was training to fly a new airplane), a visit to Sidney BC including a day trip to Botanical Beach at low tide in April, and a trip to New Mexico at the end of May, where we explored national parks and monuments before I began a wilderness medical conference in Santa Fe. The conference was fantastic and highly practical both for my northern work and for personal safety/health while enjoying the wilderness. Our next big trip will be this fall – we are aiming for Iceland.

Health:

Things were going okayish, then I had a little relapse (?) of my Transverse Myelitis in March while I was in Yellowknife. Saw the MS clinic (see prev post). Saw them again in early May. Things were pretty good actually; I even had a day where I didn’t think about my condition at all since I had no symptoms that day. At the clinic, for the first time, my physician said “well, maybe it isn’t MS.” Things were continuing to improve and I was so very close to ‘normal’ until during our trip to New Mexico I woke up with numb arms. Numb like I had slept funny on them. And honestly, that is what I told myself for a few days. “Oh I just slept funny. Hotel beds, who knows.” I was obviously in denial that it was anything significant. Home from the trip, I discussed it with my dad (a nurse) who is very good at telling me like it is. He told me I should call the MS clinic. So I’ve done that, and they will eventually (“soon”) scan my head and neck, since it’s likely I have a brain or cervical spine plaque, and that my diagnosis is MS after all. Technically my neuro issues have to be disseminated in time and space to be diagnosed as MS. We have time (multiple different events at different times) but not space (there was only one lesion on my MRI at T10). I would be surprised if there is nothing on my head/neck scans, and per previous discussion, it sounds like my specialist will suggest aggressive, early treatment to prevent more MS plaques from building up, thus reducing further weird neuro symptoms. Now I just twiddle my thumbs and do the impossible dance of not stressing with uncertainty, aka keep busy and try to ignore it.

Work:

Given my health stuff and because we have a lovely place in Vancouver to live (and that’s where my fella is most of the time), I’ve been going up north a little less. This year, I just have a few trips to Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. Next week, I’m off to Yellowknife for some clinic and then hospitalist work. I quite like hospitalist work. I really enjoy the older patients, working in a team, and the ability to divide up my time as I see fit. I can devote lots of time to the sick patients or those with new diagnoses, and I can spend little time with the stable, well patients. It’s not as “cowboy”/adrenaline-heavy/glamorous as emergency medicine, but it’s also less stressful, and I think I make more of a positive impact in people’s lives. Also, my regular commute in Vancouver is a 20 minute walk; can’t beat that for health or sanity!

Stemming from a previous interesting case at work, next month should see the publication of me and colleague Dr B’s case report in the BC Medical Journal. It’s my first peer-reviewed article and so you can bet I’ll be posting a link here to showcase the great case and our hard work!

Health Policy Stuff:

Speaking of attempts at positive impacts, I’ve been devoting a lot of my “free” time to health care policy work. I’m on medical policy committees at the local, provincial, and national scale but I’m still learning the ropes and wanted to do something a little more hands-on. I started up the Less is More Medicine website this spring and have been following it up with other related endeavours trying to spread the word about this approach:

  • interviews (in Santé, & soon The Medical Post)
  • a research project (something around Choosing Wisely pioneered by a hospitalist colleague)
  • talks (at UBC for the Medical Students in DPAS with Dr James McCormack of The Best Science (BS) Medicine Podcast, a solo one at Family Medicine Forum in November 2014 in Quebec, and tentatively at two other conferences in the spring)
  • papers (ok ok all in draft form, but I’m constantly writing things..)

It’s rewarding to be able to sink my teeth into something I really believe in. “Less is More” is certainly not my only interest but it is a pretty exciting time to be involved. Many before me have done incredible work in the area and I see my role as spreading the message as well as supporting and encouraging physicians or patients to experiment with thinking this way.

Words cannot fully express my enthusiasm and gratitude for an opportunity that I have next week. I’ll write about it here or at the Less is More blog soon.

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